Is Gatorade Zero Good for You? (Diabetics, Weight Loss, Dehydration)

Weight Loss & Diets | Written by Nathan | Updated on 23 November 2022

A man wearing a black tank top is wondering "Is Gatorade Zero good for you?" while to the right of a women in a white t shirt and they are both sitting in front of 5 bottles of Gatorade Zero all in different flavors and they're orange, blue, white, pink and peach in color

Is Gatorade Zero good for you in general? What about for diabetics, weight loss, and dehydration?

No matter why you’re asking, the information below will finally put an answer to the debate on the overall healthiness of Gatorade Zero’s ingredients, artificial sweeteners, dyes (food coloring) and their effects on the body. 

So before you start drinking Gatorade Zero everyday or instead of water, be sure you understand the ins-and-outs of what it contains and there’s even healthier alternatives below for those who are gung-ho about their health.  

Are Gatorade Zero’s Ingredients Good or Bad for You?

Finding out whether Gatorade Zero’s ingredients are good or bad is the main determinant when trying to figure out if this beverage is an okay choice. All food or drink additives must be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration before being placed on grocery store shelves, but what does that entail, exactly?

Added ingredients in foods or beverages include the following:

  • Preservatives – Instead of allowing foods to spoil, the FDA allows manufacturers to add approved ingredients that keep products fresh and safe for an extended length of time.
  • Vitamins, Minerals, and Fiber – Some companies decide to add additional nutrients to their goods to increase the nutritional value they provide.
  • Sweeteners, Spices, and Flavoring – Instead of serving up bland cuisine, flavors are elevated through a myriad of approved ingredients.
  • Coloring and Texturizers – Additives in food are common to make texture and appearance more appealing; but all substances have been okayed by the government for human consumption.1

What the above ultimately means is that Gatorade Zero’s ingredients aren’t in and of themselves harmful, but does that mean they’re healthy? 

Gatorade Zero’s Ingredients in Relation to Health

Sports drinks and electrolyte drinks, like Gatorade and Pedialyte, have been around for years and have all had similar ingredients until, in 2018, Gatorade Zero was introduced and advertised as a healthier option for athletes and the public alike. This release came at the time it did due to the popularity of low carb diets and the focus of reduced sugar consumption.2

A man in a white collard shirt is holding an orange flavored Gatorade Zero bottle with a colorful painting in the background along side a picture of a baby in a blue beanie and books on a bookshelf.

Individuals weren’t just participating in a 21 day no junk food challenge, but they were overhauling their lifestyles to completely cut out added sugar and carbs. So, many companies, like Gatorade, decided to introduce products to cater to those with these dietary requirements.

Along with a sugar free version of classic Gatorade in the form of Gatorade Zero, which comes in 10 flavors, the Gatorade Company also has released Gatorade Zero Pods, Gatorade Zero Packets, and Gatorade Zero with Protein, all with various flavors, calories and nutrient facts, and ingredients which can be seen directly below and can help answer the question – is Gatorade Zero good for you?

Gatorade Zero: Glacier Cherry Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per 12 Ounce Serving Per 28 Ounce Serving
Calories 0 10
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates <1 g 2 g
Sodium 160 mg 380 mg
Potassium 50 mg 110 mg

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Citric Acid
  • Natural Flavor
  • Sodium CitrateMixed Triglycerides
  • Sucralose
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Modified Food Starch

Gatorade Zero: Glacier Freeze Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per 12 Ounce Serving Per 28 Ounce Serving
Calories 0 10
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates <1 g 2 g
Sodium 160 mg 380 mg
Potassium 50 mg 110 mg

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Citric Acid
  • Sodium CitrateAcesulfame Potassium
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Blue 1
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Natural Flavor
  • Sucralose

Gatorade Zero: Grape Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per 12 Ounce Serving Per 28 Ounce Serving
Calories 0 10
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates <1 g 2 g
Sodium 160 mg 380 mg
Potassium 50 mg 110 mg

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Natural Flavor
  • Salt
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Red 40
  • Blue 1
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Sucralose
  • Citric Acid

Gatorade Zero: Lemon Lime Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per 12 Ounce Serving Per 28 Ounce Serving
Calories 0 5
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates <1 g 2 g
Sodium 160 mg 380 mg
Potassium 50 mg 110 mg

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Citric Acid
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Natural Flavor
  • Yellow 5
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Gum Arabic
  • Sucralose

Gatorade Zero: Lime Cucumber Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per 12 Ounce Serving Per 28 Ounce Serving
Calories 0 10
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates 1 g 2 g
Sodium 160 mg 370 mg
Potassium 50 mg 110 mg

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Salt
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Yellow 5
  • Blue 1
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Sucralose
  • Citric Acid
  • Natural Flavor
  • Sodium Citrate

Gatorade Zero: Berry Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per 12 Ounce Serving Per 28 Ounce Serving
Calories 0 10
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates <1 g 2 g
Sodium 160 mg 380 mg
Potassium 50 mg 110 mg

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Citric Acid
  • Natural Flavor
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Sucralose
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Vegetable Juice Concentrate for Color
  • Modified Food Starch

Gatorade Zero: Orange Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per 12 Ounce Serving Per 28 Ounce Serving
Calories 0 5
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates <1 g 2 g
Sodium 160 mg 380 mg
Potassium 50 mg 110 mg

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Sucralose
  • Citric Acid
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Sucrose Acetate Isobutyrate
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Yellow 6
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Gum Arabic
  • Natural Flavor

Gatorade Zero: Fruit Punch Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per 12 Ounce Serving Per 28 Ounce Serving
Calories 0 5
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates <1 g 2 g
Sodium 160 mg 380 mg
Potassium 50 mg 110 mg

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Sucralose
  • Citric Acid
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Red 40
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Caramel Color
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Natural Flavor

Gatorade Zero: Cool Blue Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per 12 Ounce Serving Per 28 Ounce Serving
Calories 0 10
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates 1 g 2 g
Sodium 160 mg 370 mg
Potassium 50 mg 110 mg

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Mixed Triglycerides
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Potassium Phosphate
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Sucralose
  • Citric Acid
  • Natural Flavor
  • Blue 1

Gatorade Zero: Strawberry Kiwi Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per 12 Ounce Serving Per 28 Ounce Serving
Calories 0 10
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates <1 g 2 g
Sodium 160 mg 370 mg
Potassium 50 mg 110 mg

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Natural Flavor
  • Salt
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Red 40
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Sucralose
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Citric Acid
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Blue 1

Gatorade Zero: Glacier Freeze Pod Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per 12 Ounce Serving Per 28 Ounce Serving
Calories 0 10
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates <1 g 2 g
Sodium 150 mg 380 mg
Potassium 50 mg 120 mg

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Citric Acid
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Sucralose
  • Natural Flavor
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Acesulfame Potassium

Gatorade Zero: Grape Pod Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per 12 Ounce Serving Per 28 Ounce Serving
Calories 0 10
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates <1 g 2 g
Sodium 150 mg 380 mg
Potassium 50 mg 120 mg

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Citric Acid
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Black Carrot Juice Concentrate for Color
  • Sucralose
  • Tart Cherry Powder
  • Natural Flavor
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Blueberry Juice Concentrate for Color

Gatorade Zero: Grape with Tart Cherry Powder Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per 12 Ounce Serving Per 28 Ounce Serving
Calories 5 15
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates 1 g 3 g
Sodium 150 mg 370 mg
Potassium 50 mg 120 mg

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Citric Acid
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Natural Flavor
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Sucralose
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Red 40
  • Blue 1

Gatorade Zero: Fruit Punch Packet Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per Packet
Calories 5
Fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 2 g
Sodium 230 mg
Potassium 70 mg

Ingredients:

  • Citric Acid
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Maltodextrin
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Natural Flavors
  • Modified Tapioca Starch
  • Sucralose
  • Red 40
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Silicon Dioxide

Gatorade Zero: Lemon Lime Packet Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per Packet
Calories 5
Fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 2 g
Sodium 230 mg
Potassium 70 mg

Ingredients:

  • Citric Acid
  • Maltodextrin
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Natural Flavors
  • Sucralose
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Silicon Dioxide
  • Beta Carotene for Color

Gatorade Zero: Orange Packet Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per Packet
Calories 5
Fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 2 g
Sodium 230 mg
Potassium 70 mg

Ingredients:

  • Citric Acid
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Maltodextrin
  • Sucralose
  • Natural Flavor
  • Silicon Dioxide
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Yellow 6
  • Tocopherols to Protect Flavor

Gatorade Zero: Grape Packet Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per Packet
Calories 5
Fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 2 g
Sodium 230 mg
Potassium 70 mg

Ingredients:

  • Citric Acid
  • Maltodextrin
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Natural Flavors
  • Modified Tapioca Starch
  • Sucralose
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Silicon Dioxide
  • Red 40
  • Blue 1

Gatorade Zero: Glacier Freeze Packet Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per Packet
Calories 5
Fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 2 g
Sodium 230 mg
Potassium 70 mg

Ingredients:

  • Citric Acid
  • Maltodextrin
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Sucralose
  • Natural Flavor
  • Silicon Dioxide
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Blue 1

Gatorade Zero: Glacier Cherry Packet Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per Packet
Calories 5
Fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 2 g
Sodium 230 mg
Potassium 70 mg

Ingredients:

  • Citric Acid
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Corn Syrup
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Maltodextrin
  • Natural Flavor
  • Gum Arabic
  • Sucralose
  • Silicon Dioxide
  • Acesulfame Potassium

Gatorade Zero: Fruit Punch With Protein Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per Serving
Calories 60
Fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 1 g
Sodium 230 mg
Potassium 70 mg
Protein 10 g

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Whey Protein Isolate
  • Citric Acid
  • Natural Flavor
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Phosphoric Acid
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Sucralose
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Red 40
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin

Gatorade Zero: Cool Blue With Protein Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per Serving
Calories 50
Fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 1 g
Sodium 230 mg
Potassium 70 mg
Protein 10 g

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Whey Protein Isolate
  • Citric Acid
  • Natural Flavor
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Phosphoric Acid
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Sucralose
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Blue 1

Gatorade Zero: Grape With Protein Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per Serving
Calories 50
Fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 1 g
Sodium 230 mg
Potassium 70 mg
Protein 10 g

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Whey Protein Isolate
  • Citric Acid
  • Natural Flavor
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Phosphoric Acid
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Sucralose
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Red 40
  • Blue 1

Gatorade Zero: Glacier Freeze With Protein Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per Serving
Calories 50
Fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 1 g
Sodium 230 mg
Potassium 70 mg
Protein 10 g

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Whey Protein Isolate
  • Citric Acid
  • Natural Flavor
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Phosphoric Acid
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Sucralose
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin
  • Blue 1

Gatorade Zero: Glacier Cherry With Protein Nutrition Information

Nutrition Per Serving
Calories 50
Fat 0 g
Carbohydrates 1 g
Sodium 230 mg
Potassium 70 mg
Protein 10 g

Ingredients:

  • Water
  • Whey Protein Isolate
  • Citric Acid
  • Natural Flavor
  • Sodium Citrate
  • Salt
  • Monopotassium Phosphate
  • Phosphoric Acid
  • Acesulfame Potassium
  • Sucralose
  • Modified Food Starch
  • Glycerol Ester of Rosin

Dyes & Food Coloring Are Safe for Most of the Population

Gatorade Zero utilizes 8 separate dyes and food colorings, all which are approved by the FDA and are considered safe for a majority of the population. 

There are three bottles of Gatorade Zero, on the left is the glacier cherry flavor, in the middle is lemon-lime and on the right is orange.

These colors and dyes are either synthetic or natural and are used to enhance the look and appeal of foods and beverages. 

Although rare, the most common issue seen with consumption of food safe dye is an allergic reaction, which is why regulations are in place for disclosing such ingredients.3

Artificial Sweeteners (Sucralose) May Have Adverse Reactions in Some

Artificial sweeteners, such as sucralose and acesulfame potassium, which are both seen in Gatorade Zero, are prevalent in many low calorie foods, but some consumers may have adverse reactions to one or both.

Sucralose is a synthetic sweetener derived from sugar, and although most who ingest it have no issues, studies (primarily performed on laboratory animals) have found that this sweetener may cause harm to healthy bacteria found in the the stomach as well as act as an appetite stimulate which can lead to unintended weight gain.4

The other synthetic sweetener used in Gatorade Zero, acesulfame potassium, had similar lab results as sucralose. While having little ill effect on the general population, research found that this particular sugar substitute may cause an increase in hunger and weight as well as a damage to the gut biome.5

Electrolyte Contents & Amounts of Sodium

The primary reason Gatorade was created was to replenish electrolytes, therefore, taking a closer look at the electrolyte contents and the amount of sodium in Gatorade Zero will help in determining whether or not it is doing its advertised job.

When sweating, or becoming otherwise dehydrated, the body loses minerals which are critically important to life functions.6 As seen on the various nutrition facts and ingredients listed above, a combination of sodium citrate, salt, monopotassium phosphate, and potassium phosphate are additives in Gatorade Zero and can all be effective in replenishing those lost minerals which subsequently resulted in an electrolyte imbalance.

Too many electrolytes can tip the scales in the opposite direction, though, and may cause an overabundance of minerals which can lead to weakness, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and diarrhea.7

Other Ingredients

Electrolytes, artificial sweeteners, and food dyes are only just some of the ingredients that make up Gatorade Zero. There are many other additives such as flavor agents, thickeners, preservatives, and even fats and proteins that make up these varieties of sports drinks. 

Many of the various ingredients, such as citric acid, can be found in a myriad of other foods, but a majority of items seen on a Gatorade label are used in such small amounts that they have little to no effect on a person’s health. 

The FDA requires ingredient lists to be ordered starting with the ingredient that is most prevalent. When it comes to Gatorade Zero products, the first ingredient is water, which means that these beverages have more water in them than any other additive. While there is no exact literature on how much water is in Gatorade Zero, years ago, it was found that Diet Coke was made up of 99% water. With that information, one can assume that a majority of a Gatorade Zero is, in fact, water.8

Do Artificial Sweeteners Impact Blood Sugar or Insulin? 

“Is Gatorade Zero good for you?” may feel like a simple question, but for those who are diabetic or suffer from blood sugar or insulin issues, finding out whether the artificial sweeteners that are added to this beverage impact glucose levels.

Although Gatorade might not be one of the top drinks to reduce belly fat in 4 days, extensive studies have been performed in relation to synthetic sweeteners and its effect on blood sugar and what the research has overwhelmingly found are that artificial sweeteners in general, not just those found in Gatorade zero, have very little impact on insulin and blood sugar.9

It is important for those with health issues, such as diabetes, to consult a physician before introducing food and drink to their diet and ask them specific questions, such as, “Is Gatorade Zero good for diabetics?” Because new ingredients are being added to the market everyday, it is imperative to be aware that a certain sweetener may affect each person’s system differently.

Is Gatorade Zero Good for Weight Loss?

As seen above, even the largest serving of Gatorade Zero (aside from the Protein variety) has negligible calories, so, is Gatorade Zero good for weight loss?

A woman with her hair is is drinking a bottle of fruit punch flavored Gatorade Zero with Protein.

The nutrition data for the 28 ounce version of each variety of Gatorade shows that there is 0 fat and 2 or less carbs. Regardless of what diet plan someone is following, Gatorade Zero should fit  without harming it. Even the Gatorade Zero with Protein should be easy to add into a day’s macros even though its nutritional profile is higher than that of the classic, packet, and pod versions.

In fact, Gatorade Zero may be a helpful tool for weight loss for those who are looking for a sports drink with no added sugar. After working out, instead of adding those calories back on with the full sugar version, replenishing electrolytes with a Gatorade Zero can reduce added calories and help with hydration.

How Many Calories Are in Gatorade Zero?

Although many varieties of Gatorade Zero list 0 calories for a single serving, as the serving size increases, the calorie count increases. While it may only amount to 5 or 10 calories for a 28 ounce serving, it is important to note that it does, in fact, have some calories. 

Gatorade Zero with Protein has between 50 to 60 calories per serving due to the addition of whey protein isolate. It is common for protein drinks to have at least 100 calories per serving, so instead of always wondering “Are protein shakes good for weight loss?”, a low cal Gatorade Zero with Protein may be a good low calorie alternative that’s more hydrating, but with far less protein too.

Is Gatorade Zero Good for Dehydration? 

Sports drinks of all kinds are advertised for hydration, so is Gatorade Zero good for you if you are dehydrated? Being dehydrated is dangerous and, not only does it mean the body has lost too much fluid, along with that fluid loss is a decrease in critical minerals.10

To rehydrate, it is vital to replace those minerals that have been lost, so drinking a Gatorade Zero could be a good start to once again becoming hydrated.

Can You Drink Gatorade Zero Everyday Instead of Water?

If someone is not working out and sweating or dehydrated for another reason, the body should have a balanced amount of minerals; but is it fine to drink Gatorade Zero everyday instead of water?  

While drinking a Gatorade Zero here and there shouldn’t be harmful, it shouldn’t take the place of water.

Drinking water, with no added ingredients, is great for hydrating on a daily basis, can keep the digestive system moving, clear the kidneys of impurities, keep skin from getting too dry, along with a myriad of other benefits. 

Replacing water with Gatorade Zero could lead to too much sodium and other processed additives, which can subsequently cause other health issues such as heart disease, hypertension, and stroke. Of course, a few Gatorade Zeros a day is just fine, but be sure to drink more water than you do anything else. 

Gatorade Zero vs Regular Gatorade: Which is Healthier? 

Gatorade Zero and regular Gatorade both have a mix of natural and artificial ingredients, so with that being said, the award for the healthiest beverage between the two will go to the one with less calories, carbohydrates and added sugar. 

How to lose weight without trying is something most people strive for, and cutting out sugary drinks, such as regular Gatorade is part of the answer. The below stats are clear; Gatorade Zero is the clear winner for health and weight loss.

  Gatorade Zero Glacier Cherry Gatorade
Glacier Cherry
Calories 0 80
Fat 0 g 0 g
Carbohydrates <1 g 21 g
Sugar 0g 21 g
Sodium 160 mg 160 mg
Potassium 50 mg 50 mg

How Much Gatorade Zero Can I Drink a Day?

Although Gatorade Zero’s flavors are delicious; as mentioned above, it is critical to add water into beverage rotations instead of only chugging bottles of Gatorade Zero; but, how much Gatorade Zero is okay to drink in a day?

A man smiling and wearing a green shirt is holding two bottles of Gatorade Zero with Protein, one flavor is cool blue and the other is fruit punch.

First, consider how much sodium, on average, is consumed in a day. Many Americans ingest 3400 mg of sodium per day, according to the CDC.11 If an individual isn’t working out and sweating or sick and dehydrated, there really is no need to drink Gatorade Zero. That being said, if daily sodium intake is under the recommended 2300 mg of sodium, enjoying a bottle of Gatorade Zero shouldn’t be harmful.

Gatorade Zero Substitutes: Low Calorie Sport Drinks Options

There are many low calorie specialty drinks on the market and finding one that fits a certain lifestyle is important. There are combinations of sports drinks, energy drinks, and water enhancers that could all be viable substitutes for Gatorade Zero.

Powerade Zero – Almost identical to Gatorade Zero, Powerade Zero is manufactured by the Coca Cola Company instead of PepsiCo. Powerade Zero has 0 calories and 0 carbs and is primarily sweetened by sucralose.

G-Fuel – This sports drink/energy drink hybrid is known as the official drink of esports. The low cal version only has 15 calories, but is G-Fuel good for weight loss? Quite a bit of controversy exists about the safety of energy drinks, but as weight loss goes, it has a similar profile to Gatorade Zero and most likely won’t negatively affect weight loss efforts.

Bang – Similar to G-Fuel, Bang is commonly known for its sport drink/energy drink combos that have 0 calories and 0 carbs. In comparison to Gatorade Zero and G-fuel, is Bang good for weight loss? With its caffeine content and other stimulants, Bang isn’t a bad drink to try when losing weight because it may help suppress appetite and help with the sweet cravings.

Mio – This particular Gatorade Zero alternative is actually a water enhancer. Some may find water to be boring, so they reach for sugar free additions, such as Mio, to make their plain beverage more appealing, but compared to the other drinks in question, is Mio bad for you or is it okay to add a squirt or two to a glass of H20? The ingredients list looks very similar to Gatorade Zero minus the electrolytes, so for 0 calories and carbs, Mio might not be a bad choice.

Healthier Sport Drinks

A majority of sports drinks have a laundry list of added colors, artificial flavors, etc., so if someone is looking for the cleanest possible solution, tracking down electrolyte water may be their best option. There are many brands, such as BodyArmour and Smart Water that provide plain purified water with only added electrolytes.

Navigating the world of sports drinks might be confusing, and finding a healthy option may feel next to impossible. However, if the question comes up “Is Gatorade Zero good for you?”, the compilation of information in this article about its nutrition and ingredients can help consumers feel at ease when adding it into their post-workout or recovery routine.

Frequently Asked Questions About Is Gatorade Zero Good for You

Is Gatorade Zero Good for Diabetics? Does it Affect Insulin?

Because Gatorade Zero has no added sugar and only uses artificial sweeteners, it should be safe for those with diabetes and should not affect insulin.

Which Is Better for You: Gatorade Zero vs Diet Soda?

Gatorade Zero is meant to aid in hydration while diet soda typically has caffeine which can cause dehydration. Both have several processed additives and should be limited, but if choosing between the two, Gatorade Zero is the better option.

Is Gatorade Zero Good for Your Heart?

Dehydration is dangerous for the heart and other organs, so if drinking Gatorade Zero to hydrate, it is good for the heart. If there is no danger of dehydration and excess sodium has already been consumed, drinking Gatorade Zero is a poor idea and the added salt can harm the heart.

Is Gatorade Zero Good for Your Kidneys?

Similar to above, dehydration is hard on the kidneys, so drinking Gatorade Zero to ensure balanced electrolytes is good for the kidneys. However, too many minerals, such as sodium, can be hard on the kidneys, so it is important not to overdo it.

Does Gatorade Have Other Low Calorie Drinks Other Than Gatorade 0?

Yes. G2 is less than half the calories of regular Gatorade. Propel is another sports drink manufactured by the Gatorade Company and is 0 calories and carbs and is a flavored water beverage with added electrolytes.


References

1U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2018, February 6). Overview of Food Ingredients, Additives & Colors. FDA. Retrieved October 26, 2022, from <https://www.fda.gov/food/food-ingredients-packaging/overview-food-ingredients-additives-colors>

2Meyersohn, N. (2018, June 20). Gatorade is going sugarless for the first time in its 53-year-history. CNN Business. Retrieved October 27, 2022, from <https://money.cnn.com/2018/06/20/news/companies/gatorade-powerade-bodyarmor-sports-drinks/index.html>

3U.S. Food and Drug Administration. (2022, October 20). Food Allergies. FDA. Retrieved October 27, 2022, from <https://www.fda.gov/food/food-labeling-nutrition/food-allergies>

4Schiffman, S., & Rother, K. (2013, November 12). Sucralose, A Synthetic Organochlorine Sweetener: Overview of Biological Issues. NCBI. Retrieved October 27, 2022, from <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3856475/>

5Bian, X., Chi, L., Gao, B., Tu, P., Ru, H., & Lu, K. (2017, June 8). The artificial sweetener acesulfame potassium affects the gut microbiome and body weight gain in CD-1 mice. NCBI. Retrieved October 27, 2022, from <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5464538/>

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About the Author

Nathan

Nathan has been a fitness enthusiast for the past 12 years and jumps between several types of training such as bodybuilding, powerlifting, cycling, gymnastics, and backcountry hiking. Due to the varying caloric needs of numerous sports, he has cycled between all types of diets and currently eats a whole food diet. In addition, Nathan lives with several injuries such as hip impingement, spondylolisthesis, and scoliosis, so he underwent self-rehabilitation and no longer lives with debilitating pain.