nSuns 531: A Unique Take On A Legendary Powerlifting Program [Spreadsheets]

Powerlifter uses chalk to prepare for first set of sumo deadlifts following the 5-day variation of nSuns 531 CAP3

The internet has made it possible to share powerlifting routines that would have been difficult to find without it, both good and bad. One such training program, nSuns 531, was named for the Reddit user who created it. And although it may have been developed by an unlikely source, it has quickly risen in the ranks of powerlifting programs that deliver exceptional results.

Get the nSuns 531 program (including nSuns CAP3) with included calculators delivered to your email immediately! Note that it is still highly recommended to read this article in full to understand how the program functions and how to properly use it to maximize your progress.

 

History Behind the nSuns 531 Powerlifting Program

Over the past few years, nSuns has posted a number of strength and powerlifting programs on Reddit and these programs have quickly grown in popularity and stature across the web.

Reddit turned out to be a great way to get the word out, and the workout has become so popular that nSuns now has his own, dedicated sub-forum, where users can discuss all things relating to his programs.

Exactly What Is nSuns 531 LP?

The main program, nSuns 531 LP, is a pure powerlifting workout, which is partly derived from two other programs:

In a quick overview of the Sheiko and Wendler programs, there is a distinct difference between the two. The Sheiko program focuses on a high volume approach in order to maximize strength gains. In fact, many of Sheiko's programs require more than 200 lifts per week and focus on muscle memory training.

Wendler's 531 workout, on the other hand, shies away from the extreme volume of Sheiko. Instead, Wendler's programs are much lower in volume, but tend to have a higher frequency of training (a.k.a trainees lift more days per week).

Both programs are highly effective, and detailed information on Wender's 531 and the Sheiko Powerlifting routine are available.

Although these programs are widely different at their core, nSuns has merged the two. By combining the 5/3/1 principles from Wendler's program with the high volume approach of the Sheiko program, the seemingly-opposing concepts actually complement each other.

In fact, the combination of two such resistance training methods is a radical approach now often referred to as powerbuilding, but the results can't be denied.

What Are the Principles of the nSuns 531 Program?

Many powerlifting coaches follow the 5-3-1 concept, which has been popularized in recent times by lifting legend, Jim Wendler. The 5/3/1 simply refers to the number of repetitions of compound lifts completed during the routine. Basically, it's 5 reps, 3 reps and 1 rep, for each key exercise.

Taking inspiration from Wendler, nSuns also applies the concept of the 531 in the program.

What's the 'LP' Stand For?

LP refers to linear periodization, which essentially refers to a progression from high volume, low intensity training to low volume, high intensity. Most linear progression programs are great for beginners, because they include a high degree of progressive resistance from week to week. In other words, each week more weight is being added–which is only possible if you are a beginner. By gradually driving the intensity up, the body is forced to continually adapt. This is a proven method for building strength and muscle mass.

This also gives the beginner time to become comfortable with many of the exercises and form, which is extremely important not just for safety but for efficiency of lifting–better form means more weight.

In order to apply the linear progression principle, the individual must increase the loads that they are lifting, as the weeks in the routine progress.

Results from different studies have shown that linear and daily undulating periodization (DUP) have a powerful impact on muscle hypertrophy and growth.

How is nSuns Different From Wendler?

Although both programs use linear periodization, the main differences between Wendler's and nSun’s 531 revolve around the regularity of the increase in weight. Wendler uses month-long progressions, but nSuns works from a weekly standpoint. This also makes nSuns more of an auto-regulating program centered around the concepts of RPE.

The workouts contained within the program follow simple principles making it a suitable option for both the beginner and intermediate lifter. For more advanced lifters, nSuns offers a CAP3 program, which is explained below.

However, the volume of the workout might be a little daunting for beginners. And ultimately, there are better options for novice lifters:

Getting Started: Understanding the 531 Workout

Before describing nSuns 5/3/1, or starting the program, there are a couple of terms to know. They will be used throughout the routine and are included in the spreadsheets.

Intensity Number of Reps (INOL)

The intensity number of reps is a guide that can be used to estimate the intensity of an exercise, and consequently, allow a lifter to accurately judge the amount of stress to his or her body. Fundamentally, this is the same exact thing as RPE-style training (as explained in extreme detail in the powerlifting bench press pyramid).

Within the training spreadsheet, there's a link to an INOL heat map, which will help you measure the level of fatigue that you are building for each lift.

INOL uses the intensity of the exercise with the number of reps to estimate the amount of stress on the body.

Use the following recommended INOL guidelines for computing the correct intensity, when completing a single exercise:

  • < 0.4 – too easy
  • 4 – 1.0 – optimal range
  • 7 – 0.8 – recommended starting point
  • – 2.0 – use occasionally, useful during loading phases
  • >2.0 – very difficult, overtraining risk

Total Daily Energy Expenditure (TDEE)

Calculating the TDEE is essential for anyone looking to improve or change their body composition. TDEE measures how many calories your body will burn per day.

A TDEE calculator is built within the spreadsheet. The reason behind the measurement is to ensure that lifters are consuming enough calories to produce the desired changes.

However, if you plan to make extreme progress while using nSuns 531, you must follow a complete powerlifting diet and meal plan. If you simply train hard and fail to eat properly, your results will be sub-par at best.

 Pre-Program Testing

Before beginning the nSuns program, or any powerlifting workout, lifters must first assess their own strength levels, using a one repetition maximum (1RM) test.

The 1RM is clearly different for everyone, and refers to the maximal amount of weight that a person can lift for one repetition of a given exercise. As with Wendler’s 531, there are four key lifts to test the 1RM for nSuns:

You can test your 1RM using maximal or submaximal testing. Maximal testing involves gradually increasing the load to the point where you can no longer manage more than one rep for the exercise. Although this provides a moderately-accurate 1RM (except for the fatigue gained while adding more weight), it can be risky. With heavy loads, form can break down, which increases risk of injury.

Submaximal testing is a much safer method of assessing strength levels, and can be nearly as accurate. It involves assessing the 3, 5, and 10 rep max and using a calculator to estimate the 1RM, or simply doing it by hand using the Epley formula. Using a higher rep range and lighter, more manageable load for the submax test helps ensure that the form remains consistent.

The formula for calculating it is very simple:

1RM = (Weight Lifted * Reps Completed)/30 + Weight Lifted

For example, if you lifted 225 for 6 reps, your estimated 1RM would be:

1RM = (225 * 6)/30 + 225 = 270

There are pros and cons for both methods of strength testing. However, beginners are not recommended to perform a true 1RM test, because the body needs time to further develop supporting tissues like tendons and ligaments which take longer to grow than muscle.

Furthermore, even advanced lifters almost always prefer submaximal testing–lifting at their max is simply too dangerous with no upside. Train hard and save the heavy 1RM for meet day on the platform.

A powerlifters 1RM is then utilized in the spreadsheets to create a custom workout routine specifically designed for each individual. However, the true 1RM is never used. Instead, training maxes are calculated, which is simply 90 percent of the 1RM. The point of using a training max, and not your “true max”, is to facilitate consistent progress. If you shoot too high with your training max, you will not progress efficiently and may even be stuck in the same spot at the end of the plan.

With that said, the training max is going to be manipulated on a week-by-week basis (providing you are able to complete a certain number of repetitions), in order to continue building strength and muscle mass.

Finding a nSuns Spreadsheet for Starting Your Workout

Unlike many generic online programs, nSuns programs come with ready-made spreadsheets and within a few clicks, the entire program is calculated specifically for each individual.

Depending on the variation of the program, there are various spreadsheets to use. First find the program that will work best for you, then follow the schedule. It's that easy.

nSuns 531 spreadsheet

The original nSuns Reddit post can be found here. The archived post includes the 5-day nSuns 531 program, along with a few variations:

  • 4-day 531
  • 6-day deadlift version
  • 6-day squat version

The 531 Workout: Volume

Each session in the program follows the same format: Two compound lifts, followed by accessory work. Additionally, variations of the compound lifts are included.

The key compound lifts and variations are:

  • Squat—Variation: Front squat
  • Deadlift—Variation: Sumo deadlift
  • Bench press—Variations: Incline bench, Close Grip bench
  • Overhead press

Each workout demands nine sets of one compound exercise followed by eight sets of a variant compound exercise…and that's before starting the accessory work. It doesn't take a genius to realize that it includes a high level of volume, and it's no wonder nSuns strongly recommends using the INOL heat map to monitor stress levels.

N suns 531 Exercise Variations Explained

The nSuns program incorporates slight variations to the exercises to increase variety (an extremely important aspect for novice and intermediate lifters) as well as maximize volume while still focusing on lifts tangentially-related to the main core lift. In other words, doing a bench press variation will carryover more to the normal bench press than a dumbell chest movement.

Although many of the changes seem small, they add up to make a big difference in the total development of every muscle in the body.

Squats

The barbell front squat is a superb alternative to the classic barbell back squat. Although the mechanics of both exercises are very similar, there are subtle differences.

  • The first difference is the placement of the bar, and this has a significant impact on the muscles that get worked. The front squat places a higher demand on the quads and upper back specifically than traditional back squats.
  • The second thing to consider is mobility. Front squats do require a certain degree of mobility through the shoulders and back in order to complete the exercise accurately. You must have mobility through the shoulders in order to push your elbows high and keep them high throughout the front squat.
  • Additionally, the thoracic spine must be mobile to allow you to keep the chest up during the exercise. Fundamentally, this is one of the main reasons to focus on front squats–it promotes thoracic extension and your body’s ability to stay upright even under heavy loads, which is extremely important for athletes.

Don't be overly concerned if your mobility isn't quite there yet, improvement will come quickly if you perform these 10 mobility drills.

Deadlift

The conventional and sumo deadlift are mechanically similar because they effectively train hip extension, but each exercise does it in a different way. The main difference between them is the set-up, specifically feet and grip position.

These slight alterations in technique, once again, have an impact on the muscles recruited. Electromyography (or EMG) assessments have been completed on the sumo and conventional deadlift to assess the electrical energy produced by the different muscle groups.

What has been found is that the sumo seems to require activation predominantly from the quadriceps and trapezius (upper back), while the conventional lift requires more effort from the glutes and erector spinae (back).

Completing both is very important not only for muscular development, but strength development as well. In fact, the entire deadlift segment method was designed around this (a method for increasing your deadlift 50 pounds within a matter of weeks–and yes, it works).

Bench Press

For variations in the bench press exercises, incline bench and close grip bench are employed. As with the previous squat and deadlift variations, the mechanics of movement are practically identical, it's only the set-up that is manipulated to enhance results.

  • The incline bench press places more stress on the upper pecs and also requires more effort from the front deltoids in the shoulders. As a result, there is less effort required from the larger and stronger pectoralis major, which means that you will likely lift less on an incline press than you would on a flat press.
  • The close grip bench press is exactly like it sounds. Lifters grip the bar at about shoulder width, which moves the stress (not all of it) from the chest to the triceps. However, too narrow a grip puts excessive and dangerous force on the wrist, increasing risk of injury–so don’t go too narrow.

Exercise to Target Results: nSuns 531 Accessories

In this program, nSuns has intentionally not scheduled specific accessory exercises to perform. By giving you a target area to focus on, rather than a specific exercise, you have a large degree of flexibility and choice with all accessory exercises.

Like other similar programs, the accessories follow bodybuilder sets and reps. In order to maximize muscle growth (hypertrophy), it's recommended to stick to a rep range of 6-12 reps per exercise. However, you can tailor your accessory work and sets/reps to meet your own training goals.

Each day focuses on a specific area of the body.

  • On Monday, also known as 'International Chest Day', the focus for all accessories is chest, back and arms.
  • On Tuesday the focus switches to legs and abdominals.
  • Wednesday sees a return to the upper body with shoulders and chest accessories.
  • Thursday is a combination of both back and abdominals.
  • Friday is slightly different because you complete arm accessory work and then any other accessories you feel necessary.

Do remember, prior to commencing the nSuns program, you must first assess your 1 rep max and then calculate your training max for each compound lift.

Additionally, if you aren’t using a training journal to log your reps, sets, and weight lifted, you will be unable to effectively progress on accessory movements. Bottom line: keep a journal and use it to help you.

nSuns 531 Training Tables

By following the training tables, it's easy to keep track of the exercises you'll need to perform. The following tables cover the basic nSuns programs.

nSuns 531 5-Day Variation

Compound (Sets x Reps) Variant (Sets x Reps) Accessory Focus
Monday Bench
9 x 8, 6, 4, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8+
OH Press

8 x 6, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Chest, Back, Arms
Tuesday Squat

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 3, 3, 5, 5, 5+

Sumo Deadlift

8 x 5, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Legs, Abs
Wednesday OH Press

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 3, 3, 5, 5, 5+

Incline Press

8 x 6, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Shoulders, Chest
Thursday Deadlift

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3+

Front Squat

8 x 5, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Back, Abs
Friday Bench

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 5, 3, 5, 3, 5+

Close Grip Bench
8 x 6, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8
Arms,Other

 

 nSuns 4-Day Schedule

Compound (Sets x Reps) Variant (Sets x Reps) Accessory Focus
Monday Bench
9 x 8, 6, 4, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8+
OH Press

8 x 6, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Chest, Back, Arms
Tuesday Squat

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 3, 3, 5, 5, 5+

Sumo Deadlift

8 x 5, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Legs, Abs
Thursday Bench

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 5, 3, 5, 3, 5+

Close Grip Bench

8 x 6, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Arms, Other
Friday Deadlift

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3+

Front Squat
8 x 5, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8
Back, Abs

 

nSuns 6-Day Squat Program

This program has been designed with a specific squat focus, and is performed exactly the same as the original 5-day nSuns program in terms of exercise, sets, reps, and accessory focus.

The only difference is the addition of a 6th day which includes high volume, heavy squatting and sumo deadlift work.

Compound (Sets x Reps) Variant (Sets x Reps) Accessory Focus
Monday Bench
9 x 8, 6, 4, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8+
OH Press

8 x 6, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Chest, Back, Arms
Tuesday Squat

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 3, 3, 5, 5, 5+

Sumo Deadlift

8 x 5, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Legs, Abs
Wednesday OH Press

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 3, 3, 5, 5, 5+

Incline Press

8 x 6, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Shoulders, Chest
Thursday Deadlift

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3+

Front Squat

8 x 5, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Back, Abs
Friday Bench

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 5, 3, 5, 3, 5+

Close Grip Bench
8 x 6, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8
Arms,Other
Saturday Squat

8 x 3

Sumo Deadlift

6 x 3

Upper Back, Legs

 

nSuns 6-Day Deadlift Program

Very simply, the 6-day deadlift program is an exact replica of the squat program. The only difference is the reversal of exercises on Saturday.

The deadlift becomes the compound exercise and the squat becomes the variant exercise.

Compound (Sets x Reps) Variant (Sets x Reps) Accessory Focus
Monday Bench
9 x 8, 6, 4, 4, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8+
OH Press

8 x 6, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Chest, Back, Arms
Tuesday Squat

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 3, 3, 5, 5, 5+

Sumo Deadlift

8 x 5, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Legs, Abs
Wednesday OH Press

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 3, 3, 5, 5, 5+

Incline Press

8 x 6, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Shoulders, Chest
Thursday Deadlift

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 3+

Front Squat

8 x 5, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8

Back, Abs
Friday Bench

9 x 5, 3, 1+, 3, 5, 3, 5, 3, 5+

Close Grip Bench
8 x 6, 5, 3, 5, 7, 4, 6, 8
Arms,Other
Saturday Deadlift

8 x 3

Front Squat

6 x 3

Upper Back, Legs

 

Progressions Guide for All nSuns 531 Programs

You should increase your training max each week. However, this is entirely dependent on how well you perform during the 1+ set (AMRAP set), so take careful note of your own performance every day.

With each 1+ set:

Rep Range Completed Progression
0-1 No Change
2-3 + 5lbs
4-5 + 5-10lbs
5+ + 10-15lbs

Accessory Exercise Options

Since the specific accessory exercises for each day aren't set, you can choose any that you like that will target the designated area. Most lifters and beginners will recognize these basics, but the following options are just a few of many that will work.

Always remember that when performing this accessory work, form is a crucial factor. Not only does it limit the risk of accidental injury, it ensures that you get the maximum benefit from the exercise.

And don’t forget what accessory work is designed for–stimulating different muscle groups in isolation to encourage further hypertrophy. What they aren’t is an opportunity to go heavy and take away from your compound lifts. Lift with a purpose: heavy on the compound movements and light on the accessories. Note that this doesn’t mean never progress on your accessory lifts–it just means you shouldn’t be going to failure on any sets.

  • Reverse fly: This targets the deltoids (top of the shoulder), rhomboids (located on the upper part of the spine and back, shaped like a rhombus), and trapezius (large triangular muscle on the upper back), and can be performed on some machines, or simply standing in a modified lunge position with dumbbells. When you raise your arms to the sides, remember to pause for a second before lowering them to complete the rep. It does not take much weight to get great stimulation with this movement.
  • Rowing: This is an effective choice for back, arms, or abs. Rowing, whether performed on a machine or with free weights, targets the erector spinae (middle of the back), wrist extensors and flexors, triceps, biceps, deltoids, pectoralis major, and more. It’s one of the best accessory movements you can pick.
  • French Press: This exercise works the triceps (back of the upper arm). It is easily performed on a machine, but free weights can sometimes deliver better results.
  • Incline Reverse Hammer Curl: You perform this exercise on an inclined or flat bench. Holding dumbbells in each hand, arms at the sides, palms facing each other, extend the arms straight above your body, toward the ceiling. The curl is performed by bending at the elbow, lowering the weight down, then back up. This exercise works the biceps.

  • Push-ups and Pull-ups: These are old standards for a reason.
  • Lateral Arm Raises—Forward and Side: Perform these with dumbbells to fry your deltoids (in a good way).
  • Planks—Regular and Reverse: Planks are excellent for the core and can be modified to enhance the impact. It looks simple, but targets the transverse abdominis, multifidus, diaphragm, and pelvic floor (do not neglect ab accessory work–this is one of the most common pitfalls for beginner and intermediate lifters).
  • Lunges: Although your squats are working your legs and the deadlift is working your back, lunges can be an effective way to target the legs, glutes, and hamstrings. Note, however, that these should be done very light–lunged are a common exercise to get injured on when going too heavy. In all honesty, it’s best to choose other exercises.
  • Donkey Kick: For lack of a better term, this exercise is performed on the hands and knees. This exercise targets the hamstrings and glutes (of each leg separately) by moving your knee from the floor waist height. (Think Jane Fonda workout.) You can add variations and increase the impact by keeping the leg straight, or adding small ankle weights.
  • Crunches and Leg Raises: A benefit of a crunch is that you don’t need a bar or any other equipment. If you do have access to a pull-up bar, however, leg raises are an excellent option and translate very well to squats and deadlifts. Do both to develop your abs.
  • Calf Raises: There are many different variations for calf raises (standing, sitting, using dumbbells, using a machine) but the main thing to know is that you can point toes in, out or straight to work different angles.
  • Chin Ups: Again, an exercise that has been getting results for decades. Do chin ups to work your back, biceps, and some shoulders.

Lifters can also check out the Reddit threads that discuss accessory work, and see other examples of how to incorporate them directly into your program.

This is not an exhaustive list by any means but is intended to get you thinking about what exercises you might choose to compliment the main compound lifts.

What Is nSuns CAP3

The final attachment found in the original nSuns post is a second program known as CAP3, which stands for the Cyclical AMRAP Progression 3-week program (as opposed to a 6 week powerlifting plan).

Get the nsuns CAP3 Program with included calculators delivered to your email immediately! Note that it is still highly recommended to read this article in full to understand how the program functions and how to properly use it to maximize your progress.

 

The program follows a similar structure to the original 531, however, instead of running in 1 week cycles, it runs for 3 weeks per cycle and focuses more on high repetitions and lower intensities.

Be aware that this program is a little more advanced. It allows for some personalization in terms of variant exercises, but has scheduled accessory work, instead of the free style in the original program. It also focuses somewhat on rowing exercises.

The program is very complex, so rather than explain the entire plan, this sections covers week one. There is a lot going on in CAP3 and the exercise order, number of sets, and number of reps per exercise change each week. On the spreadsheet you will find highly-detailed instructions to guide you through the 3 weeks.

nSuns Workout Terms for CAP3

Here are a couple of keywords that you must understand prior to viewing the program:

  • AMRAP = As Many Reps As Possible

Work at the defined weight for as many reps as possible until you fail.

  • MRS = Max Rep Set

Reduce the weight in accordance with weight defined in program and perform a minimum number or prescribed reps or more, if possible.

  • EMOM = Every Minute on the Minute

The goal is to complete a specified number of reps for as many sets as it takes before you can no longer complete the prescribed number of reps. Make sure you are taking only a one minute rest between each successful set. Using a stopwatch is a must.

CAP3 Training Table

The following table shows an example 'week 1' schedule for the CAP3 program.

Compound (Sets x Reps) Variant (Sets x Reps) Accessory Work
Day 1 Bench
7 x 4
(Last set AMRAP)
Bench Variant
1 x 10+
1 x MRS (8+ reps)1 x EMOM (5 reps)
Chest & Biceps
200 Band Pull Aparts
100 Banded Shoulder Dislocations
4 x AMRAP Chin/Pull Ups
Day 2 Deadlift Variant

9 x 5, 5, 5, 5, 4, 4, 4, 4
Optional – 1 x 4

Row Variant

1 x 6+

1 x MRS (4+ reps)

1 x EMOM (3 reps)

Back, Abs & Triceps

200 Band Pull Aparts

100 Banded Shoulder Dislocations

30 Weighted Chin/Pull Ups

Day 3 Squat

7 x 3

Optional – 1 x 3

Pressing Variant

1 x 8+

1 x MRS (6+ reps)

1 x EMOM (4 reps)

Shoulders & Legs

200 Band Pull Aparts

100 Banded Shoulder Dislocations

Mobility

Day 4 Bench

8 x 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 5, 5, 5
(Last Set AMRAP)

Bench Variant

1 x 8+

1 x MRS (6+ reps)

1 x EMOM (4 reps)

Chest & Biceps

200 Band Pull Aparts
100 Banded Shoulder ,islocations
4 x AMRAP Chin/Pull Ups

Day 5 REST REST REST
Day 6 Deadlift
1 x 6, 1 x 4 or 1 x 2
(AMRAP)
Row Variant

1 x 8-12

3 x 10

Back, Abs & Triceps

200 Band Pull Aparts

100 Banded Shoulder Dislocations

15 Weighted Chin/Pull Ups

Day 7 Squat Variant

8 x 5, 5, 5, 5, 4, 4, 4, 4

Optional – 1 x 4

OH Press

1 x 6+

1 x MRS (5+ reps)

1 x EMOM (3 reps)

Legs & Shoulders

200 Band Pull Aparts

100 Banded Shoulder Dislocations

Mobility

 

CAP3 nSuns Accessories

As with any 531 program, there are always accessory exercises to complete for each workout session following completion of the compound movements. The exercises you choose should focus on the prescribed areas and nSuns recommends you stay within a hypertrophy rep range (6 – 12 reps). However, the number of reps you complete can be altered based on your fitness goals.

Unlike the 531 program, there are compulsory accessory exercises that must be completed toward the end of each session for CAP3–predominantly resistance band work, pull-ups, and chin-ups.

These are programmed in order to gradually ramp-up the volume of each session and bring about optimal changes in terms of both strength and mass. Much of the resistance band work and scheduled mobility work will also help you stay mobile as you progress, which is key for maintaining optimal performance (especially if you are an intermediate or advanced lifter).

Find nSuns Reddit Forums

As previously mentioned, nSuns now has a sub-forum on Reddit where users from all around the globe ask questions, analyze programs and give updates on their own progress.

In fact, the forum contains a number of informational posts on that allow you to proceed through the program with relative ease. For example, you can find posts like the 'Official Accessory Check Thread' and beginner's thread.

By joining Reddit, you'll have the opportunity to post any questions regarding nSuns programs and share your progress with like-mind people around the world. This makes the subreddit a very useful resource!

Getting nSuns Results

On the nSuns Reddit page, you will find many testimonials from users who have performed and benefited from nSuns programs. By reading through many of the posts, you will find that many lifters have used the program to see significant increases in strength levels as well as improvements in body composition and muscular size.

Incidentally, nSuns himself mentions that by using his program he was able to increase his powerlifting total from 905 lbs to 1215 lbs – an increase of 310 lbs! To clarify, a person's powerlifting total simply refers to the collective total of weight lifted across the three powerlifts: the squat, deadlift and bench.

Just a few testimonials on the 'Share Your Success' thread demonstrate the impact that following this program has had.

'Here are my lifts from January to April in pounds:

  • 6-Day Squat:
  • OHP: 95 -> 140
  • Squat: 150 -> 240
  • Deadlift: 200 -> 320
  • Bench: 120 -> 195'.

(u/OiledPelicanEgg)

'I’m fairly new to this subreddit and thought I would write a post to tell you guys how I’m doing so far on the program. I am running the 5 day version of the program and just started week 3. This is definitely my favorite program I have ever run; however, the workouts are kicking my ass. Here is my progress so far on the program just 3 weeks in:

  • Bench 195 x 5 -> 205 x 6
  • Squat 275 x 7 -> 290 x 5
  • Deadlift 345 x 6 -> 355 x 7
  • Overhead Press 120 x 5 -> 130 x 4'

(u/RamboLifts)

While it is clear that nSuns' high volume approach isn't for the faint-of-heart, the results demonstrate it's certainly an effective method of bringing about substantial strength and size improvements.