Wendler 531 Workout: Jim’s Legendary Powerlifting Program [ALL 5 Variations]

Powerlifter prepares to complete a set of squats from the Wendler 531 workout program designed to build strength and muscle

In 2008, a powerlifter by the name of Jim Wendler was sick and tired of the cookie cutter programs he was asked to perform, so he decided to develop his own strength program that would actually deliver results… and the Wendler 5/3/1 program was born.

The plan he created is an effective, impactful program that integrates the fundamentals of strength training in a workout that is both adaptable and effective.

What is the Wendler 531 Program and Who Is Jim Wendler?

The 531 is one of the most simple, yet effective, strength building programs in existence and it has been used, and continues to be used, by beginners, gym enthusiasts and top level athletes all over the world.

Since its formation, the 5/3/1 has been adjusted and updated by Wendler to ensure it adapts to the often changing world of resistance training and reflects his ever-growing experience and expertise.

Wendler is an athlete with an extensive history of fitness and training. He played football for the University of Arizona where he was a letter winner on three occasions and has competed many times in a variety of powerlifting events.

In his professional career, he achieved an incredible personal best total of 2375lb, which included squatting 1000 lbs, deadlifting 700 lbs and benching 675 lbs.

Posted By James Wendler: “Done at a bodyweight of 275lbs, this squat was a milestone for me. Although no longer impressive in today’s world of powerlifting this lift meant a lot to me. Done at the Ironhouse meet in 2005 (I think).”

During his time in the fitness industry, Wendler has become highly knowledgeable and is renowned as a speaker, author, and coach of top athletes.

After spending 20 years in the fitness industry, Wendler now believes that his calling in life is no longer coaching, but as a writer.

He has his own website where he posts regular articles based on powerlifting, strength training, program design and ongoing professional development as a coach.

He also writes for the popular strength training website T-Nation and it’s not a surprise that much of his work is reposted on a large number of health and fitness websites and social media accounts.

What’s The 5/3/1 Program All About?

Because there were many debates and much confusion surrounding strength training, it prompted Wendler to create his 531 Program, which is a cyclical system. Wendler designed it to enhance his own focus in the gym using uncomplicated techniques, which eliminate tedious steps and puzzling tasks.

But, unlike other bodybuilding or powerlifting programs, the 531 is intended to do more than simply build size.

Wendler wanted a training program that was capable of doing more than just squats, deadlifts and bench presses to build size. He wanted a method of building functional strength through movement, with the ability to be flexible and in great condition.

The underlying theme of the 5-3-1 is similar to other strength building workouts and programs because multi-joint, “compound” movements form the foundation of the program.

Improving foundational lifts (or core lifts) brings a plethora of benefits, plus the 531 incorporates a number of accessory exercises that maximize strength and muscle building by providing additional volume which promotes hypertrophy.

5/3/1 for Beginners—Building The Strength You Need

In the program outline, Wendler emphasizes that 531 is for anyone and everyone, regardless of age or training experience.

The program is just as challenging for the highly trained athlete as it is for the ground zero novice, but it’s important to start light, and not let the ego interfere with the weight used in the workout.

This is even more crucial for the beginner as their nervous system (which controls movement) needs time to become accustomed to the movements required for many of the exercises.

Bottom line: if you are a beginner, focus on learning the movements first before increasing weight. Ultimately, an alternative novice program may be better:

Do your research and choose the program that best suits your needs and goals.

The 5/3/1 Routine—Everything You Need In Four Week Cycles

The 5-3-1 program is conducted over four weeks, however, it’s designed and intended to be performed over numerous cycles.

Once the initial four weeks are completed, trainees are then ready to go back to the starting point and complete the program again… and again… and again.

The goal is simple: at the conclusion of each 4-week cycle, the lifter should be stronger and able to start the next cycle with heavier weight.

There are four sessions per week, and each session delivers a different full body workout.

Many individuals, specifically bodybuilders, tend to follow “splits” where they target different muscle groups each session. However, recent research has indicated that in terms of optimal strength gains, full body workouts are superior.

Ultimately, as long as a plan is built around compound lifts, the same result is achieved. And luckily, all powerlifting routines are.

Furthermore, some lifters prefer to use an 8 week program built on the principles of DUP. The results speak for themselves. However, this form of training is a bit more advanced than Wendler’s 531 as it includes 5-6 days of training per week.

The 5/3/1 Workout-Breaking Down The Technique

Each session in the 5-3-1 doesn’t religiously stick to the classic powerlifting 5 by 5 workout structure.

Wendler has create a technique that employs a variety of rep ranges, which place an adequate amount of stress on the muscles to stimulate adaptation. Each 531 Workout follows the same simple structure of one core exercise followed by two accessory exercises.

There are four core lifts: squat, bench press, deadlift and overhead press.

These four core exercises have been selected based on their potential to bring about significant strength improvements.

The accessory work is designed to iron out any imbalances, improve on specific potential weaknesses, provide additional volume for hypertrophy and ultimately facilitate a better performance with the main lifts.

1 Repetition Maximum (1RM)-The Training Foundation

The 1 Rep Max (1RM) test is the amount of maximum weight that can be lifted only one time for any given exercise. Many people judge the effectiveness of the best powerlifting programs based on their potential to increase the 1RM.

With this workout, however, the 1RM is only necessary in order to calculate the ‘training max’ used. Don’t worry if this sounds confusing at this point, it’s actually really simple to understand.

Although the true 1RM is a sure way to get an accurate measurement of a person’s strength level, performing the test can be risky because there is a high chance of form breaking down, ultimately leading to injury.

A safer way of assessing strength levels is to use a challenging weight and estimate the 1RM instead.

A recent study found that for each strength-training exercise, particularly in upper body exercises, using a “prediction equation based on a 4-6 RM set was a better predictor of 1-RM strength than the prediction equation based on a 7-10 RM set.”

Simply put, use a challenging weight you can complete for about 5 reps. Then use the Epley formula:

1RM = (weight lifted * reps)/30 + weight lifted

For example, if you completed 4 repetitions of 225 pounds on the bench press, your estimated bench press 1RM would be [(225 * 4)/30 + 225] or 255 pounds.

Like many other workout programs, before beginning the 531 routine, testing and learning your individual 1RM is needed, that way you can calculate the weight you’ll use for the squat, deadlift, bench and overhead press.

Basically, in the 531 system, you use your individual 1RM for calculating the ‘training max.’ The following section explains how to do it.

Wendler’s 5/3/1 Calculator

For this program, it’s recommended that an individual perform anywhere between 3-6 reps for each exercise and then use the Max rep calc to estimate what the 1RM for that specific exercise (note: this is another way to do the same thing explained above using Epley’s formula).

It’s calculated with this equation (Epley’s formula written a different way mathematically):

Weight x Reps x 0.0333 + Weight = 1RM

For example, if a person can bench 180 lbs for six reps, without losing form, the bench max calculator would look like this:

180 x 6 x 0.0333 + 180 = 215lbs

For the squat performed for three reps at 260lbs, the Squat max calculator would look like this:

260 x 3 x 0.0333 + 260 = 285lbs

A very important note to make at this point is that, for the Wendler 531 program, athletes should not use their true estimated 1RM to calculate the weights for each core lift.

Instead of the true max, this system incorporates the ‘training max,’ which is simply the amount of weight that can be used without risking a breakdown in form.

The “conservative training max” used is typically around 90% of the true 1RM.

For example, if my true 1RM for deadlift is 320lbs, to calculate my training max, I will use 90% of 320lbs, which would be 290lbs. I will then use 290lbs as my 1RM in the Wendler system for calculating the appropriate weight for the deadlift.

Some powerlifting routines advocate using a training max that is 97% of one’s 1RM. Ultimately, using a more conservative training max will allow for more consistent progress.

For example, if you use a lighter training max you can be much more confident in your ability to progress to heavier weights throughout the course of the plan. But if you start too heavy, you may find yourself fighting an uphill battle for every pound increase–not a very motivating scenario.

5/3/1 Spreadsheet—Easy To Use

One of the great features in this workout plan is that anyone may download the 5-3-1 Spreadsheet and customize it for an individualized program.

The requirements couldn’t be easier:
• Input 1RM max values
• Select Goal weight progression for each lift
• Select the day of the week the core lifts will be performed
• Done!

The spreadsheet will automatically generate a specific 4 week program (alternative 6 week program found here). And, because the program is intended to be performed in cycles, once the first four weeks are finished, simply revisit the sheet and update the values.

Get the 5/3/1 Sheet here.

(Be sure to open it with Google Sheets to enable the editing and customization features.)

Understanding Jim Wendler’s 531 in Full [PDF Template]

Now that the principles and structure of the 5/3/1 program have been explained, you’re ready to take an in-depth look at what the training program will look like on paper.

There are a number of variations to the system—the versatility is one of the best things about it—and this particular variation is known as the triumvirate. It utilizes three exercises per session (Tri = 3).

Week 1

Each core exercise set should be approximately 65, 75, 85% of the 1RM, respectively.

Day Core Exercise Accessory 1 Accessory 2
1 Overhead Press
3 x 5
Dip
5 x 15
Chin Up
5 x 10
2 Deadlift

3 x 5

Good Morning
5 x 12
Hanging Leg Raises

5 x 15

3 Bench Press

3 x 5

DB Chest Press

5 x 15

DB Row

5 x 10

4 Squat

3 x 5

Leg Press

5 x 15

Leg Curl

5 x 10

 

Week 2

Each core exercise set should be approximately 70, 80, 90% of the 1RM, respectively)

Day Core Exercise Accessory 1 Accessory 2
1 Overhead Press
3 x 3
Dip
5 x 15
Chin Up
5 x 10
2 Deadlift

3 x 3

Good Morning
5 x 12
Hanging Leg Raises

5 x 15

3 Bench Press

3 x 3

DB Chest Press

5 x 15

DB Row

5 x 10

4 Squat

3 x 3

Leg Press

5 x 15

Leg Curl

5 x 10

Week 3

Each core exercise set should be approximately 75, 85, 95% of the 1RM, respectively.

Day Core Exercise Accessory 1 Accessory 2
1 Overhead Press
3 x 5, 3, 1
Dip
5 x 15
Chin Up
5 x 10
2 Deadlift

3 x 5, 3, 1

Good Morning
5 x 12
Hanging Leg Raises

5 x 15

3 Bench Press

3 x 5, 3, 1

DB Chest Press

5 x 15

DB Row

5 x 10

4 Squat

3 x 5, 3, 1

Leg Press

5 x 15

Leg Curl

5 x 10

 

Week 4 (Deload)

Each core exercise set should be approximately 40, 50, 60% of the 1RM, respectively.

Day Core Exercise Accessory 1 Accessory 2
1 Overhead Press
3 x 5
Dip
5 x 15
Chin Up
5 x 10
2 Deadlift

3 x 5

Good Morning
5 x 12
Hanging Leg Raises

5 x 15

3 Bench Press

3 x 5

DB Chest Press

5 x 15

DB Row

5 x 10

4 Squat

3 x 5

Leg Press

5 x 15

Leg Curl

5 x 10

 

Between each set, adequate rest periods must be taken in order to let the body’s energy systems recover. For the core exercise, 3-5 minutes of rest, per set, should be taken.

The phosphocreatine (ATP-PC) system is utilized with heavy lifts (1-5 reps), and it typically takes 3-5 minutes to replenish energy. Accessory exercises require a shorter period of recovery time, because the reps require a different energy system (anaerobic system), which recovers faster than the ATP-PC system, so 1-2 minutes will suffice.

Remember, in addition to the strength training program, 2-3 conditioning sessions should be completed each week. Wendler specifically suggests incorporating hill sprints and prowler work.

Seeing 5/3/1 Results

Make no mistake, this program is effective at building strength and size, providing it is followed closely. Wendler is a walking, talking testimony of its effectiveness.

Remember, Wendler initially created the program for his own training, and he has displayed almost superhuman feats of strength during his powerlifting career.

One testimonial on the Wendler website is from an individual called Gabriel, who was able to markedly increase his deadlift and squat.

His results:

Prior to starting the program:
• Squat: 450lbs
• Deadlift: 500lbs

After just a year of application:
• Squat: 515lbs (+65lbs)
• Deadlift: 565lbs (+65lbs)

Not only are these very impressive strength improvements for just one year of training, but Gabriel reported extremely positive physique changes, specifically regarding muscular size and definition.

Avoiding 5/3/1 Workout Common Mistakes

In an article written for T-Nation, Wendler covered some common rookie mistakes which should be avoided when working through his program.

Mistake Number One:

Trying to customize the program. Trying to combine two different programs or adding other ideas is likely to interfere with the potential results of 5-3-1 and hinder its effectiveness. It’s best to just stick to the program.

Mistake Number Two:

Putting too much emphasis on the accessory exercises. The focus of the program must be the core lifts. Remember that these accessory exercises are designed to complement, not be the foundation of the routine.

Mistake Number Three:

Getting too cocky. When lifting for strength improvement, it’s important to keep ego in check so that it doesn’t interfere with your training. Letting your pride dictate the weight you’re trying to shift is a bad idea. It just takes one poor rep to risk serious injury and put you on the couch. Gradual, incremental progress, using a safe and efficient movement is the entire point of the program and will yield the best results.

Mistake Number Four:

Rushing through the program. This is just as risky as overloading the bar and could be a recipe for disaster. Although the world is now ‘on-demand’ and waiting for results is hard, the rest intervals and lifting schedule are crucial to achieve the best results, don’t rush it.

Expanding Your Results: The 5/3/1 Bodybuilding Program

In addition to the basic workout, another 5/3/1 program is available, which has been tailored toward bodybuilders.

This version of the program takes a slightly different approach, although the four core lifts still form the foundation (which some would argue makes it a powerbuilding program and not a true bodybuilding plan).

However, for bodybuilders, there are many more exercises to complete and more isolation exercises, which focus on just one muscle group, across one joint, to concentrate the stress to specific muscle groups and encourage growth in certain areas.

The number of sets and reps also differ from the original 5/3/1. Plus, the program doesn’t alter from week to week. Wendler believes this setup is ideal for bulk development in both strength and size.

For conditioning, Wendler recommends 30-40 minutes of walking per day. The reason for the switch is because the high intensity exercises in the original 5/3/1 program, such as hill sprints and sled pushes, could potentially interfere with the recovery from strength training bouts.

Light cardio ensures that the bodybuilder will reach optimum recovery between strength sessions ensuring peak muscular adaptation. Plus, maintaining an aerobic baseline promotes overall health.

The 5/3/1 Bodybuilding Weekly Template:

Day Core Exercise Accessory 1 A2 A2 A4
1 Overhead Press
3 x 5, 3, 1
DB Shoulder Press
4 x 12
Side / Rear Laterals
4 x 12
Barbell
Curls
4 x 12
Preacher Curls
4 x 12
2 Deadlift

3 x 5, 3, 1

Bent Over Rows
4 x 12
Chin Ups

4 x 10

Good Mornings
4 x 10
Hanging Leg Raises
4 x 12
3 Bench Press

3 x 5, 3, 1

Weighted Dips

4 x 10

DB Flyes

5 x 10

Tricep Pushdowns
5 x 20
Push-ups

4 x Failure

4 Squat

 

3 x 5, 3, 1

Leg Press

 

5 x 15

Leg Curl

 

5 x 15

Leg Extensions

4 x 12

Ab Wheel

 

4 x 12

Boring But Big Program Overview

The 5/3/1/ Boring But Big program is described as “brutal,” in Wendler’s own words. It is a simplistic hypertrophy (muscular growth) program based on the 5/3/1 principles, with a concentrated focus on maximizing muscle growth.

The program requires you to complete 5,3, and 1 rep of your core exercise before moving on to 5 sets of 10 reps of the core exercise, or core exercise variations, as accessory work. And no, that’s not an error.

Although it is a high volume program, the accessory work is supplemental, so you don’t need to go super heavy. Wendler suggests using 50-60% of your training max.

Once the accessory 5 sets of 10 have been completed, you move away from the core lift and onto another assistance exercise.

That concludes the strength side of the program… however, you still have prowler pushes twice a week and four, 2-mile walks to complete as conditioning, which explains why Wendler calls it brutal.

5/3/1 BBB Template: Weekly Strength Training Template

Day Core Exercise Accessory 1 Accessory 2
1 Overhead Press
3 x 5, 3, 1
Overhead Press
5 x 10
Lat Accessory
5 x 10
2 Deadlift

3 x 5, 3, 1

Deadlift

5 x 10

Ab Accessory

5 sets

3 Bench Press

3 x 5, 3, 1

Bench Press

5 x 10

Lat Accessory

5 x 10

4 Squat

3 x 5, 3, 1

Squat

5 x 10

Ab Accessory

5 sets

BBB Nutritional Aspect

Strength training is only part of the battle for putting on size. Nutrition is just as important, if not more, than your strength training regimen.

In order to facilitate effective recovery from the targeted stresses of strength training and drive an increase in size, your body requires more energy than normal. You must place yourself in a calorie surplus in order to bring about changes in muscular size.

In order to give you an idea of roughly how much you may need to eat to bring about growth, Wendler has provided a sample powerlifting diet to compliment the program.

Nutrition Plan

Breakfast

  • 6 eggs (scrambled with cheese or hard boiled)
  • 1-2 cups of oatmeal
  • 1 apple

Lunch (1)

  • 10oz steak
  • 6-8 red potatoes
  • Steamed vegetables

Lunch (2)

  • 2 chicken breasts
  • 2 cups of Spanish rice
  • Steamed vegetables

Dinner

  • 2 chicken breasts or 10 oz steak
  • Large bowl of pasta and marinara sauce
  • Steamed vegetables

Recommended Supplements

  • Protein Drinks
  • ZMA (Zinc, Magnesium, Aspartate and Vitamin B6)
  • EFA’s (Essential Fatty Acids)
  • Vitamin C

The pure volume and intensity of the 5/3/1 bbb program along with “big eating” will force the muscles of the body to adapt, increasing in size and strength.

Building the Monolith Overview

This is another tough hypertrophy program designed by Wendler. It is a physically demanding program, which requires dedication from start to finish… but delivers incredible results.

It is more detailed than the BBB and runs for 6 weeks. Although it will push an athlete both physically and mentally, the potential benefits are massive, and hopefully by the end of the program you will be too!

As with the BBB program, the strength training program is combined with a nutrition plan to maximize growth.

Building the Monolith Template

All percentages in this variation refer to the percentage of your training 1RM and should be followed with the same dedication as any other 531 program.

Strength Training: Week 1
Day Exercise 1RM % Exercise 1RM % Accessories Total Reps
1 Squat

7 x 5

1st Set – 70%
2nd Set – 80%
3-7 Sets – 90%
Overhead Press
3 x 5
1 x AMRAP
1st Set – 70%
2nd Set – 80%
3rd Set – 90%
AMRAP – 70%
Chin Ups
Face PullsDips
100
100100-200
2 Deadlift

5 x 5

1st Set – 70%
2nd Set – 80%
3-5 Sets – 90%
Bench Press

7 x 5

1st Set – 70%
2nd Set – 80%
3-7 Sets – 90%
DB Rows

Curls

5 x 10-20

100

3 Squat

3 x 5
1 x 20

1st Set – 70%
2nd Set – 80%
3rd Set – 90%1st Set – 45%
Overhead Press

5 x 10

All Sets – 70% Weighted Chin-Ups

Face Pulls
Shrugs

5 x 5

100
100

*AMRAP = As Many Reps As Possible

Week 2
Day Exercise 1RM % Exercise 1RM % Accessories Total Reps
1 Squat

7 x 5

1st Set – 70%
2nd Set – 80%
3-7 Sets – 90%
Overhead Press
3 x 5
1 x AMRAP
1st Set – 70%
2nd Set – 80%
3rd Set – 90%
AMRAP – 70%
Chin Ups
Face PullsDips
100
100100-200
2 Deadlift

5 x 5

1st Set – 70%
2nd Set – 80%
3-5 Sets – 90%
Bench Press

7 x 5

1st Set – 70%
2nd Set – 80%
3-7 Sets – 90%
DB Rows

Curls

5 x 10-20

100

3 Squat

3 x 5
1 x 20

1st Set – 70%
2nd Set – 80%
3rd Set – 90%1st Set – 45%
Overhead Press

5 x 10

All Sets – 70% Weighted Chin-Ups

Face Pulls
Shrugs

5 x 5

100
100

Week 3
Day Exercise 1RM % Exercise 1RM % Accessories Total Reps
1 Squat

7 x 5

1st Set – 75%
2nd Set – 85%
3-7 Sets – 95%
Overhead Press
3 x 5
1 x AMRAP
1st Set – 75%
2nd Set – 85%
3rd Set – 95%
AMRAP – 75%
Chin Ups
Face PullsDips
100
100100-200
2 Deadlift

5 x 5

1st Set – 75%
2nd Set – 85%
3-5 Sets – 95%
Bench Press

7 x 5

1st Set – 75%
2nd Set – 85%
3-7 Sets – 95%
DB Rows

Curls

5 x 10-20

100

3 Squat

3 x 5
1 x 20

1st Set – 75%
2nd Set – 85%
3rd Set – 95%1st Set – 55%
Overhead Press

5 x 10

All Sets – 75% Weighted Chin-Ups

Face Pulls
Shrugs

5 x 5

100
100

 

Once you reach the end of Week 3, reassess and adjust your 1RM Training Max and then follow the same structure for the next 3 weeks to complete the entire 6 weeks.

Then take a deload.

Monolith Conditioning Work

The conditioning work is not supplementary to the strength training in this program… in fact, it is an essential element. As tempting as it might be, don’t skip it!

Day Exercise
1 Prowler Drives
2 2 Mile Walk (weight vest recommended)
3 10 Mile Cycle on Fan Bike

Monolith Nutrition Plan

Breakfast

  • 8 eggs
  • 4 bacon pieces
  • 4 pieces of toast
  • 2 bananas

Lunch (1)

  • 1 pound ground beef
  • Pasta with marinara sauce

Lunch (2)

  • 2 double cheeseburgers
  • Fries

Dinner

  • 6 eggs
  • Half a pound of ground beef
  • Cheese/ lettuce/ tomato / taco sauce
  • Combine to make an egg/meat burrito

Jim Wendler 531 PDF and Spreadsheets

Much of Wendler’s work can be found in PDF or sheet format on numerous online locations.

His advanced work, which builds onto the Basic 5/3/1 program, including the Boring But Big and Building the Monolith programs can all be found and downloaded online.

However, if the plans help you, consider purchasing them online to support Jim Wendler and respect all of the time he took to put together the program.

531 Forever: Digging Deeper Into the Method

As previously mentioned, Wendler sees himself as more of an author and writer now, than a coach. His “5/3/1 Forever” book was written in 2017, and expands on the 5/3/1 method.

Moreover, the book contains 40 training templates, making it a must-have training manual for any gym goer, bodybuilder, powerlifter, or strength trainee.

The Wendler Impact: Spin-off and Variations Inspired By 5-3-1

There are other strength programs which incorporate the 531 principle, gaining inspiration from Wendler’s work.

Two of the most readily recognized are the Bigger, Faster, Stronger Workout, and the nSuns 531.

Bigger Faster Stronger Workout

Although Wendler’s program is designed for anyone to use, the Bigger Faster Stronger (BFS) program is not.

As with the 5/3/1, BFS employs the core lifts and accessory exercises, however, the core lifts included in this program are extremely different from Wendler’s program. The reason for the change is that the bigger, faster, stronger workout is designed for athletes who want to hone and enhance their overall abilities, not just size and strength.

There are 6 core exercises instead:
• Parallel squat
• Bench press
• Hex bar deadlift
• Box squat
• Towel bench press
• Power clean

There are two compulsory accessory exercises–the stiff leg deadlift and lunges–all other accessories, however, are selected based on the athlete’s sport.

For athletes who want to maximize stamina, reach, or speed, this program offers an adaptable and effective solution.

Beyond BFS, Juggernaut Method strength training and DUP for athletes are two effective alternatives for athletes.

nSuns 531

A second strength training program which has gained huge popularity is one created by Reddit user nSuns. It is directly inspired by Wendler’s 5-3-1, and follows a similar design and structure.

The weekly linear progression program follows a 3 day weightlifting routine–the weight used each week is increased in linear fashion. This differs from typical Wendler programs that increase at the conclusion of the training cycle (typically 4-weeks).

nSuns is suited more for beginners while the traditional 531 routine caters more towards intermediate lifters.

The nSuns program increases quicker, and if you can comfortably complete more reps than are prescribed, use the following guide to safely increase the load:

  • 0-1 reps over: No change
  • 2-3 reps: + 5lbs
  • 4-5 reps: + 5lbs – 10lbs
  • 5-6 reps: + 10lbs – 15lbs

Ultimately nSuns program is just a variation, but it’s an excellent method for beginners.

Tough, simple and effecive. Make no mistake, programs designed using 5/3/1 principles are challenging. But you know what they say…nothing good ever comes easy.

If you’d like to learn more about this bodybuilding master, check out a recent podcast by Wendler on Brute Strength. In it, he talks about his early days at University of Arizona Football, lifting, training, competing, and of course coaching.

He also explains why he created 5/3/1 and how important it is to keep things simple in life, and in training, to achieve maximum success.